BIG BUFF BOB THE ROOSTER MOVES TO THE FARM

BIG BOB is a “Buff Cochin” breed rooster. That means he is buff (golden) colored and that he has feathered feet and legs.

BIG BOB couldn’t stay at his former home since he is a rooster but he is very happy to have moved to Winterpast Farm where a trio of young female Buff Orpington hens await his loving attention and masculine company.

20130816-212732.jpg

BIG BOB arrived at Winterpast today with his own coop and is overnighting with one of his new same breed lady friends. He caused quite a stir amongst the hens today as they gathered round to meet him.

20130816-212925.jpg

20130816-212936.jpg

Farmer Mary plans to move him to larger quarters where he can reside with his three hens and, hopefully, make baby Buffs who will be available as backyard pets in the future.
Buff Orpington chickens are well known as sweet, good egg producers, well feathered to overwinter well, and good mothers amongst breeds of chickens.

20130816-213234.jpg

20130816-213245.jpg

20130816-213758.jpg
Farmer Mary often takes along a sweet Buff Orpington when she takes her animals to Vacation Bible Schools, Birthdays and other events. In general, the don’t mind being picked up and petted.

Learn More

TREATS FOR PET CHICKENS

From BACKYARD CHICKENS Magazine
Sorry when Farmer Mary copied the chart the lines didn’t reproduce here..Might give chicken owners a few new ideas, and farm visitors ideas of treats to bring the chickens at Winterpast Farm!

Treat
Type General Opinions

Apples Raw and applesauce
Apple seeds contain cyanide, but not in sufficient quantities to kill.

Asparagus–Raw or cooked–Okay to feed, but not a favorite.

Bananas Without the peel High in potassium, a good treat.

Beans–Well-cooked only, never dry–Also, greenbeans
.
Beets –Greens also.
.
Berries –All kinds–A treat, especially strawberries.

Breads –All kinds – good use for stale bread or rolls–Feed starches in moderation.

Broccoli & Cauliflower –Tuck into a suet cage and they will pick at it all day.

Cabbage & Brussels Sprouts –Whole head –
Hang a whole cabbage from their coop ceiling in winter so they have something to play with and greens to eat.

Carrots Raw and cooked They like carrot foliage too.

Catfood Wet and dry Feed in strict moderation, perhaps only during moulting

Cereal Cheerios, etc. –Avoid highly sugared cereal such as Cocopuffs, etc.

Cheese Including cottage cheese Feed in moderation, fatty but a good source of protein and calcium

Corn On cob and canned, raw and cooked
.
Crickets (alive) Can be bought at bait or pet-supply stores. Great treat – provides protein and it’s fun to watch the chickens catch them.

Cucumbers -Let mature for yummy seeds and flesh.

Eggs Hardcooked and scrambled are a good source of protein, and a favorite treat. Feed cooked eggs only because you don’t want your chickens to start eating their own raw eggs.

Eggplant

Flowers Make sure they haven’t been treated with pesticides, such as florist flowers might be. Marigolds, nasturtiums, pansies, etc.

Fruit Pears, peaches, cherries, apples

Grains Bulgar, flax, niger, wheatberries,etc.

.Grapes -Seedless only.–For chicks, cutting them in half makes it easier for them to swallow.

Grits-Cooked

“Leftovers”
Only feed your chickens that which is still considered edible by humans, don’t feed anything spoiled, moldy, oily, salty or unidentifiable.

Lettuce / Kale
Any leafy greens, spinach collards, chickweed included.
A big treat, depending on how much other greenery they have access to.

Mealworm–Available at pet supply stores or on the internet, although shipping is expensive!
A huge(!) favorite treat, probably the most foolproof treat on the books.

Meat scraps of any kind. Not too fatty. In moderation, a good source of protein

Melon Cantelope, etc. Both seeds and flesh are good chicken treats.

Oatmeal Raw or cooked Cooked is nutritionally better.

Pasta / Macaroni Cooked spaghetti, etc. A favorite treat, fun to watch them eat it, but not much nutrition.

Peas -Peas and pea tendrils and flowers
.
Peppers (bell)
.
Pomegranates -Raw-Seeds are a big treat.

Popcorn -Popped, no butter, no salt.

Potatos / Sweet Potatos/Yams Cooked only – avoid green parts of peels! Starchy, not much nutrition

Pumpkins / Winter Squash Raw or cooked Both seeds and flesh are a nutritious treat.

Raisins
.
Rice -Cooked only
Pilaf mixes are okay too, plain white rice has little nutrition.

Scratch Scratch is cracked corn with grains (such as wheat, oats and rye) mixed in. Scratch is a treat for cold weather, not a complete feed. Toss it on the ground and let them scratch for it for something to do.

Sprouts Wheat and oat sprouts are great! Good for greens in mid-winter.

Summer Squash Yellow squash and zucchini

Yellow squash not a huge favorite, but okay to feed.

Sunflower Seeds–with the shell still on is fine to feed, as well as with the shell off.

Tomatoes –Raw and cooked.

Turnips –Cooked.

Watermelon –Served cold, it can keep chickens cool and hydrated during hot summers.
Seeds and flesh are both okay to feed.

Yogurt Plain or flavored A big favorite and good for their digestive systems. Plain is better.

20130816-211356.jpg

20130816-211401.jpg

20130816-211757.jpg

20130816-211803.jpg

20130816-211808.jpg

20130816-211813.jpg

20130816-211818.jpg

20130816-211824.jpg

20130816-211830.jpg

Learn More

NEW GOATS AT THE FARM!

A friend of the farm volunteers as a groomer at an animal shelter and called Farmer Mary from there a few days ago offering to bring two female goats who had been found wandering and were never claimed.

20130814-084740.jpg
When they arrived, they were shy, but they soon learned to follow visitors around and are eating out of hands very happily.

20130814-084823.jpg
The new goats have been named MIDNIGHT (the black one who is very pregnant) and STAR (who also looks a bit bulky around the middle, but time will tell if a little bonus will arrive!)
MIDNIGHT is particularly fond of apple slices and carrots. STAR is a bit shy, but getting used to her new life at Winterpast Farm.
Come meet them soon and be thinking up some good names for the babies to come!

20130814-085130.jpg

Update a few days later…they are settling in and seem VERY content with their new life at Winterpast Farm!

20130816-212110.jpg

20130816-212124.jpg

Learn More

PLAN A VISIT TO WINTERPAST FARM SOON

The best way to schedule a farm visit is to contact Farmer Mary by text (919-244-1800) or email (marymomfarmer@hotmail.com) and suggest a date and time for a visit. She may say fine or may ask you to pick another time or another date if she has a Birthday party or away event scheduled.

The farm is open, usually, every day including holidays, weekdays,weekends and Sundays after noon. However, Farmer Mary is a single mother with four teens and occasionally has to be away from the farm helping with marching band and other teen activities. Please do not just drop by the farm. Farmer Mary tries to keep her weekly schedule updated on the Winterpast Farm Facebook page and the www.winterpast.org website. Texting is ALWAYS the best way to contact Farmer Mary, especially for last minute requests for visits. If she is busy with her four teens or with her animals at a preschool, church, away event, group visit, or Birthday party she will NOT have time to chat on the phone.

When you have a date and time settled, plan what you will bring along to the farm:

—Food for animals can include apples, carrots, kale, cereal, crackers, whole wheat bread, grapes, celery, green beans and more. Just nothing moldy and no meat or cheese (unless it is a treat for CHARLIE the farm dog!)
—plenty of water for hot days
—possibly a picnic lunch or supper? Farmer Mary has picnic tables set up in several areas. he also has hand sanitizer, antibacterial wipes and water and soap available for hand washing.

20130808-153746.jpg

20130808-154748.jpg

20130808-154814.jpg

20130808-154836.jpg

When you get to the farm (12936 Ghoston Road Wake Forest 27587) pull in the gravel drive by the big plywood llama and petting zoo sign.

20130808-155009.jpg

Even if your GPS says “turn” DO NOT turn down the adjoining neighbors private road. Please look for this sign and follow the arrow to the farm entrance.

20130808-155139.jpg

Texting Farmer Mary when you arrive is always a good idea especially if you are early or late.
919-244-1800
PLEASE PARK MINDFULLY (of other visitors)! Farmer Mary has a new parking lot and tries to park her car as an example of where to park.

20130808-155530.jpg

20130808-155646.jpg
These are two pictures of good parking.

When you enter the gate you can pay your admission (cash or check) in the wooden box at the gate or pay Farmer Mary.

PLEASE RESPECT OUR ADMISSION PRICE
Farmer Mary is raising teens and animals with her farm income; this is NOT a sideline hobby. Admission is $10 per person. Adults $10. Children $10. Toddlers $10. Adopted children and Foster children visit at no charge. (Farmer Mary adopted two of her four children.) Farmer Mary does not have change. Please have exact cash (or buy a dozen fresh eggs $5 and/ or a beautiful peacock feather $5). You may also pay by a check made out to Winterpast Farm. Thank you.

Farmer Mary will greet you and help you transfer your animal feed into a green bucket which is easier to carry around.

20130808-160050.jpg
Feel free to feed animals (offer any animal anything; sometimes they will surprise you: did you know the goose loves carrots and the peacocks love grapes?)feel free to take pictures…Farmer Mary will assist with holding animals and with the pasture walk. She is also always happy to take photos of your group with your camera.

Please keep an eye on your children and do not allow them to open cages, close cages (some pens are open until animals put themselves to bed there at night), chase animals or open gates to the pasture.

There is a composting toilet to the left of the peacocks.
Please feel free to ask Farmer Mary any questions or for any assistance.

20130808-161130.jpg

20130808-161236.jpg

20130808-161353.jpg

20130809-070014.jpg

20130809-070031.jpg

20130809-070046.jpg

20130809-070103.jpg

20130809-070115.jpg

Learn More

FARM TOUR WILL INCLUDE WINTERPAST FARM THIS YEAR

Winterpast Farm has been selected to be part of. Large tour of farms this Fall. Volunteers are needed to help get the farm spiffed up before the tour, and also the days of the tour. We may have 500 visitors each day!
Saturday, Sept 21 from 1-5 and Sunday, Sept 22 from 1-5 are the tour hours.
Let Farmer Mary know if you have a few spare hours to help with fixing up the farm to get ready. Projects include building the actual composting area for the composting toilet, working on e new pond environment (planting, moving rocks and bamboo into place to build a water feature, building a short fence to allow visitors to get from the front yard to the pond gate), fixing up and painting some of the recently donated bunny hutches which all have potential but need work….

See their website for more info
http://www.carolinafarmstewards.org/etft/

20130805-114901.jpg

20130805-114924.jpg

20130805-114937.jpg

20130805-114945.jpg

20130805-114956.jpg

20130805-115005.jpg

20130805-115013.jpg

20130805-115021.jpg

20130805-115035.jpg

Learn More
' .